The stigma of yoga

Toadtele

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I injured my back working construction in 2005. First dr. recommend surgery. The state sent me for a second opinion. Second dr. sent me to therapy. I did 8 weeks. Very effective. My therapist recommended yoga. I’ve always been into fitness so I dove right in. Changed my life. Seriously.
Trouble is I live in a place where every man is expected to carry a gun and never do yoga. I approached yoga as a physical discipline, no different than weight training, but quickly learned not to say that I do yoga.
I’m in great shape for my age and am frequently asked how I stay fit. So instead of saying I do yoga, I say I do mobility exercises. That sounds manly enough, right?
Well I work for a small contracting company, where we are all close. Also we are all into fitness. We have built a pickle ball court, an indoor basketball court and a very well equipped gym on our premises. Everyone here knows that I do “mobility exercises“ every morning.
One of our project managers, who could be considered a textbook version of manliness, just got in to yoga after a CrossFit injury. Now the owner of our company wants to hire a yoga instructor to give the team private classes in our gym.
Have things changed with the stigma of yoga? Is it now acceptable for gun toting rednecks like us to admit that we do yoga?
 
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SixStringSlinger

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Places where yoga is normal have been around much longer and in some cases the people there live much longer and more healthily than in places where carrying a gun is normal.

I'll never get over guys who think that taking care of yourself is not "manly".

Manliness is definitely an area where people "doth protest too much".
 

Timbresmith1

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I injured my back working construction in 2005. First dr. recommend surgery. The state sent me for a second opinion. Second dr. sent me to therapy. I did 8 weeks. Very effective. My therapist recommended yoga. I’ve always been into fitness so I dove right in. Changed my life. Seriously.
Trouble is I live in a place where every man is expected to carry a gun and never do yoga. I approached yoga as a physical discipline, no different than weight training, but quickly learned not to say that I do yoga.
I’m in great shape for my age and am frequently asked how I stay fit. So instead of saying I do yoga, I say I do mobility exercises. That sounds manly enough, right?
Well I work for a small contracting company, where we are all close. Also we are all into fitness. We have built a pickle ball court, an indoor basketball court and a very well equipped gym on our premises. Everyone here knows that I do “mobility exercises“ every morning.
One of our project managers, who could be considered a textbook version of manliness, just got in to yoga after a CrossFit injury. Now the owner of our company wants to hire a yoga instructor to give the team private classes in our gym.
Have things changed with the stigma of yoga? Is it now acceptable for a gun toting rednecks like us to admit that we do yoga?
Tell them you started with ballet, but the bulge in your tights attracted the wrong kind of women. Their wives….
 

oregomike

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I injured my back working construction in 2005. First dr. recommend surgery. The state sent me for a second opinion. Second dr. sent me to therapy. I did 8 weeks. Very effective. My therapist recommended yoga. I’ve always been into fitness so I dove right in. Changed my life. Seriously.
Trouble is I live in a place where every man is expected to carry a gun and never do yoga. I approached yoga as a physical discipline, no different than weight training, but quickly learned not to say that I do yoga.
I’m in great shape for my age and am frequently asked how I stay fit. So instead of saying I do yoga, I say I do mobility exercises. That sounds manly enough, right?
Well I work for a small contracting company, where we are all close. Also we are all into fitness. We have built a pickle ball court, an indoor basketball court and a very well equipped gym on our premises. Everyone here knows that I do “mobility exercises“ every morning.
One of our project managers, who could be considered a textbook version of manliness, just got in to yoga after a CrossFit injury. Now the owner of our company wants to hire a yoga instructor to give the team private classes in our gym.
Have things changed with the stigma of yoga? Is it now acceptable for a gun toting rednecks like us to admit that we do yoga?

Just be honest and say you do yoga. Nothing wrong with being a responsible gun owner and taking care of yourself. Yoga will keep you moving well into life better than any weight training will.

Fact: Lynn Swann, one of the best wide receivers (Steelers) of all time, attributed his success on the field to his ballet classes. No one eff'd with him about his ballet.
 

Bones

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It's a bummer that we have to get sick or injured before we take an interest in our physical wellbeing. I'm 9 years past the point where my neurologist wanted me to have back surgery and my Primary(who is an Osteopath) convinced me that surgery was the wrong course of action. Yoga/meditation/eating right it all WORKS.
 

Toadtele

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It's a bummer that we have to get sick or injured before we take an interest in our physical wellbeing. I'm 9 years past the point where my neurologist wanted me to have back surgery and my Primary(who is an Osteopath) convinced me that surgery was the wrong course of action. Yoga/meditation/eating right it all WORKS.
Amen brother.
 

studio1087

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Prior to my successful back surgery I did a lot of yoga.

I wonder if any of the gun toting dues (I'm a gun toting dude by the way) could hold the average pose for 25 seconds. People who really do yoga are tougher than nails. They are remarkably strong.

You'll get that after your first session. It's pretty amazing. You'll be breaking a sweat and almost shaking when you're new and the person next to won't even break a sweat.

Just go do it. It's good stuff. Their are lots of Yoga studios where you buy a punch card that might be good for 6 or 10 sessions and you start going to beginner sessions when ever you want. They'll have a web site with all the various session times and who's teaching them. It's pretty smooth to get into. You need a matt and two foam blocks. It will cost 20 bucks at Walmart.

You're doing a positive thing. Be proud!
 

The Angle

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I'd say yes, the definition of manliness is changing, along with attitudes toward gender diversity, respect for women, honesty about the past, and many other things that used to be fairly toxic in society. We're at a moment of realignment on many axes. Moments of realignment have a long history of being confusing and chaotic. With strength and perseverance, we'll come out the far end better for it. Fly your yoga flag high, and dare anyone to mock it.
 

Whatizitman

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Things have changed somewhat over the years as more regular folk find the benefits from a physical and/or medical perspective.

Part of the issues are not just cultural, but regional, as well. If the only thing available in the area is a few small studios that cater excessively to Western hippy-dippy yoga culture (and women, in particular), you will not see the average dudes come in. For the same reasons you don’t see too many dudes hanging out in salons or aerobic studios.

As more yoga activities move into the medical sphere, however, the playing field gets a little more level. Search out low impact or medical yoga classes. They may show up at hospitals, community centers, or YMCAs, etc…

I have a high tolerance for wacky crystal new age BS. What I don’t have a lot of tolerance for is a yoga situation where the attendees are trying to out-yoga each other and the world around them. That’s actually the opposite of what yoga is all about. Stay away from those scenes, and search out communities that are truly welcoming of new comers, medical patients, kids, elderly, disabled, etc.. They’re out there. You just gotta search it out.

Namaste, b***es.
 

elihu

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One of the good things about getting older is that you care less about what other people think. I did yoga with my wife for about a month and I’ve never felt better in my whole life. Now she’s too busy and there’s not many classes here in rural Texas. I still make stretching an important part of my daily routine but would like to get back into it.
 

VonBonfire

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Have things changed with the stigma of yoga? Is it now acceptable for a gun toting rednecks like us to admit that we do yoga?
The simple answer: Yoga has a stigma in the western world because it is non-christian eastern religion. And yes, real yoga is a religious practice even in it's watered down popular form the way reading horoscopes in the back of the paper is also a religious practice.
 

Deeve

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The yoga they teach at my gym has been well attended by a diverse set of members.
Currently, the time slot that works best for me is called circuit training, which is really only different by the addition of medium and light barbells on some of the moves.
It's all mobility training, as far as I care - and far cheaper (and more fun) than post-injury physical therapy.
Peace - Deeve
 

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